TEDx KNUST 2015

Many people often do not know the right time to start a business and often get it wrong. Some drop out of school or even quit their jobs and often become penniless, resulting in frustration which could have be prevented.

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Photo credit: TEDxCulverCity via Visual hunt / CC BY-NC-ND

In present day Ghana we have a good number young people challenging the status quo a society with a gradually increasing number entrepreneurs and productive professionals. These achievers are often hard to find and due to time constraints cannot share their success stories with many. TEDx -gives these achievers a platform to share their thoughts and even inventions with others.  To inspire students, a TEDx community was formed at the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology.

This year’s TEDx KNUST event saw over ten graduates and professionals share their ideas -from drones to science kits, arts, social media and entrepreneurship. They eloquently delivered and students asked mind bugging questions.

What struck me most was that, Winnifred Selby  -20 years old, co-founded a company at age fifteen and is currently running three organisations. How cool is that?
Who remembers this  documentary; “Locked but not forgotten”? It was about the plight of remand prisoners who had been locked up for years without any lawyer hearing their case. The responses were massive, even The President and the Chief Justice acted promptly. Seth Kwame Boateng is the name. He left the audience rethinking how they defined success and beginnings.

Who would have thought drones will exist in Ghana? Let alone one built from scratch here in this country? Well Samuel Amoako-Frimpong -a university graduate defied the odds with his team when they worked on a quadcopter as their final year project. It can be used for anything, from delivering waakye to chasing criminals.

Participants listening to one of the speakers
Participants listening to one of the speakers

“The carpenter” as she likes to be called, spoke extensively on art and its value. She believes in the value of locally made products and services and is championing them.
Yakubu Yusuf co-founded Grab a Cup -a breakfast delivery company. Unlike the already existing, they are championing the health benefits of breakfast and also preventing pollution by selling in paper bags.

Asabea Agbenu spoke on a sensitive issue. Many people often do not know the right time to start a business and often get it wrong. Some drop out of school or even quit their jobs and often become penniless, resulting in frustration which could have  be prevented. She advised students to make sure they finish with their degree because it adds value to you; paraphrasing -‘A photographer who studied architecture may be more respected than someone who is just a photographer without a degree’

Charles Ofori – Antipem -the “Playtivity” science guy also spoke about his new product -Playtivity, a science kit that will help erase the stereotype that science is difficult. His background story was great!

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Adjei Agyei Baah spoke about poetry and haiku. Haiku is a three line poem summarizing the natural beauty in anything around you. His poetry renditions wowed the audience.
Christian Worgbah spoke about how to effectively use the internet especially social media.
Bernard Ako-Jackson  spoke about his art and its impact. He also retreated the fact that we should be unique and not just do things because someone is doing It. His art installations were marvelous.

Where is Ghana’s biggest e-waste dump site? Abogbloshie! This market has housed e-waste for decades and is causing extreme harm to all those around it. To help curb this menace some students are developing a machine that will help destroy the unwanted parts without burning them. And many other speakers.

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Bernard Ako-Jackson spoke about his art and its impact.

The only problem was with the poor attendance, most student will not attend such an event but will be pay loads of money trying to acquire such knowledge after school.